Maximum Ride: The Final Warning - James Patterson *Editing this review a bit so it's not so lacking in punctuation and whatnot. Gosh, reading it makes my eyes bleed. I'm sorry I used to be such a troll.* So, I remember the lovely morning I got this book. It was on Easter, and my parents gave it to me. And I was all like, "GOSH GOLLY, THANKS MOM AND DAD!" Because at the time, I was a hardcore Maximum Ride fan and I'd been eagerly awaiting this day to have the fourth book in my hands.The first thing I noticed about it was that it was disappointingly ... small. While the first three books had been 400+ pages or so, this one was like less than 300. And in James Patterson pages, that's like 50 pages––considering the large font and ADHD chapters that only last for half a page. But I figured ... Oh, well. It was Maximum Ride. It was sure to be awesome ... right?Well, I read the book in one sitting. And when I finished it, I wanted to throw it across the room and scream. Basically, nothing important happened throughout this entire book. It was one of those books where I stared at the last page for a really long time and then finally said to myself, "That's it?!"At the time, I was sorely disappointed. But in retrospect, and after seeing how the books only got worse and worse (although maybe none of them quite as bad as this one), I shouldn't have been all that surprised. When I read the first few books, I had no idea who James Patterson was. As I got older, I learned that he is ... well ... not the best person in the world. He pretty much makes a ton of money by cranking out random ideas and then making poor little ghostwriters write his books for him. I'm fairly certain that more than one person wrote this series, based on its schizophrenic nature––the fact that almost none of the plot lines are ever resolved, and the characters' personalities gradually disappear as the series progresses. That said, I thought the first few books were not so bad. They were at least action-packed and I actually cared about the characters. Around the third book I started to realize that nothing made sense and that the author was just throwing plot twists in our faces and then never explaining them. I pretty much still stand by what I said in my original review for this book: "I thought the third book was okay--Max & co. saving the world from some evil company trying to take over the world? A little cliché, but tolerable. But then Max & co. going to Antarctica to study cute fuzzy penguins and then preaching to Congress about global warming???!!! WHAT???!!! Did some global warming research foundation pay James Patterson or something, because I am completely confused!!!"Really, the sudden change in pace and ... well, the plot in general ... is just completely jarring. I understand that the fourth book is supposedly the first in some kind of sub-series. But even so, it just doesn't make sense. Why would a bunch of scientists genetically alter a bunch of children to "save the world" and then make them go take care of penguins? Why would they even need freaking wings in order to do that?I could go on and on about the flaws in this series, but if you read my reviews for books 5 and onward, I think I've done enough of that already ...